Meet the Young Leaders: Tobias Nwenwu

Tobias Nwenwu
European Athletics

As part of our ongoing series, we have interviewed members of the European Athletics Young Leaders Youth Team.

They were all nominated by their federations to take part in the Young Leaders Forum in Amsterdam last summer and are all recognised as potential leaders of our sport in years to come. 

 

The European Athletics Young Leaders Community is a platform for active young and ambitious people who are interested in developing work and life skills, getting involved in community service and making new friends.

Tell us a little bit about yourself!

I started competing for my club Wolverhampton & Bilston AC at the age of 11, mainly in the sprints, and carried on up until the age of 21. Since then, I’ve taken a multi-disciplinary training routine and I am competing in a variety of events: hammer, high jump, discus, javelin and 100m.

I started coaching a year after completing my BTEC (Business and Technology Education Council) diploma in sport at the age of 18 to stay involved as I was injured at the time. I was named Volunteer of the Year by England Athletics this year which has urged me to work harder and make a difference within the sport.

At my club, I currently help coach U9, U11, U13 and U15s in multi-events with a strong team of coaches. I also work with local community trusts and the city council to get our coaches into schools and community centres to coach athletics in an attempt to make the sport much more popular in Wolverhampton. During the competition season, I help officiate or team lead in Sports Hall, Triangular League and the Young Athletes’ League competitions.

How did you become involved with the European Athletics Young Leaders Community?

My involvement stemmed from my achievements as a young volunteer in England and my involvement in the Youth Advisory Group.

What is your favourite thing about athletics?

My favourite thing about athletics is how it brings people from various backgrounds together.

Who is your athletics hero and why?

I have two heroes in athletics in no particular order, Koji Murofushi due to his commitment to the sport and his outstanding athleticism. My other athletics hero is Samia Omar [Somali Olympian who died in 2012 while trying to cross the Mediterranean]. I think her story of determination and resilience I believe can inspire a generation!

Which areas of the sport are you particularly interested in?

My main interests lie in inclusion as I believe this is an area that the global athletics community tends to neglect.

If you could change one aspect of the sport, what would you change and why?

I would make the sport much more inclusive and accessible for those currently without the opportunity to participate in athletics.

Where do you see yourself within the sport in ten years’ time?

I see myself being part of a team with the aim of improving athletics’ inclusion and leading on coaching education programmes.

What has been your highlight of Young Leaders so far?

The highlight of the Young Leaders is the fact that I get to interact with so many like-minded people that inspire me to keep working hard to improve myself as an individual and improving the quality of the sport within my area.